Externalising - commonly asked questions

Complied by Maggie Carey & Shona Russell

The following questions and answers about 'externalising' have been created in response to regular requests from practitioners. We've tried here to respond to some of the questions we are most commonly asked in training contexts.

We've enjoyed the collaborative process of coming up with these questions and answers. A wide range of people have been involved and we've really appreciated this.

This article first appeared in The International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, 2002. DCP. Adelaide.

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Re-Authoring: Some answers to commonly asked questions

Complied by Maggie Carey & Shona Russell

The understanding that our lives are shaped by the stories that we create about them underpins all narrative practice. This practice-based paper seeks to answer some commonly asked questions about re-authoring conversations. Practical examples are offered throughout, as are explanations of the thinking that informs re-authoring conversations.

This paper was originally published in the 2003 No.3 issue of The International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work. DCP. Adelaide.

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Remembering: responding to commonly asked questions

Complied by Shona Russell & Maggie Carey

Re-membering is a therapeutic practice commonly engaged with by those interested in narrative therapy. This accessible paper offers an introduction to, and clarification of, some of the intricacies of this practice.

This paper was originally published in the 2002 No.3 issue of The International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work. DCP. Adelaide.

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Outsider-witness practices: some answers to commonly asked questions

Compiled by Maggie Carey & Shona Russell

The use of outsider witnesses is a therapeutic practice commonly engaged with by those interested in narrative therapy. This accessible paper offers an introduction to, and clarification of, some of the intricacies of this practice. This paper was created through a collaborative process involving well-respected therapists from Australia, the USA, Mexico, South Africa and the UK.

This paper was originally published in the 2003 No.1 issue of The International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work. DCP. Adelaide.

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Feminism, therapy and narrative ideas: Exploring some not so commonly asked questions

Complied by Shona Russell & Maggie Carey

In this paper we have been interested to engage with some not so commonly asked questions about feminism, therapy and narrative ideas. So we asked a number of therapists who are engaged with narrative ideas some questions about what feminism means to them, how it influences their work and what feminist issues they are currently grappling with. What followed was an invigorating and challenging process.

This paper was originally published in the 2003 No.2 issue of The International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work. DCP. Adelaide

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Family Process Journal September Issue 2009

The Absent but Implicit: A Map to Support Therapeutic Enquiry

MAGGIE CAREY, SARAH WALTHER & SHONA RUSSELL.

KEYWORDS

Narrative Therapy - Absent but Implicit - Michael White - Narrative Practice - Responding to Trauma

ABSTRACT

This paper describes recent developments in the use of the "absent but implicit" in narrative therapy. Michael White used the term "absent but implicit" to convey the understanding that in the expression of any experience of life, there is a discernment we make between the expressed experience and other experiences that have already been given meaning and provide a contrasting backdrop, which "shapes" the expression being foregrounded. In therapeutic conversations, we can use the concept of the "absent but implicit" to enquire into the stories of self that lie beyond the problem story. We review as a foundation for appreciating this particular practice the ways in which narrative therapy supports an exploration of the accounts of life that lie "outside of" the problem story. We follow this by a more specific description of how the concept and practice of the "absent but implicit" offer further possibilities for bringing forward these often neglected territories of life. This description includes the presentation of an "absent but implicit" map of narrative practice, which reflects the authors' shared understandings of Michael White's most recent explorations and teachings.

RESUMEN

Este artículo describe los avances recientes en el uso de lo "ausente pero implícito" dentro de la terapia narrativa. Michael White utilizó el término "ausente pero implícito" para transmitir la interpretación de que en la expresión de cualquier experiencia de vida, hacemos un discernimiento entre la experiencia expresada y otras experiencias a las que ya se les ha dado significado, y proporcionamos un telón de fondo contrastante que "da forma" a la expresión ubicada en primer plano. En conversaciones terapéuticas, podemos usar el concepto de "ausente pero implícito" para indagar sobre las historias del yo que se encuentran más allá de la historia del problema.

Estudiamos, como base para apreciar esta práctica particular, las maneras en las cuales la terapia narrativa facilita un análisis de las historias de vida que se encuentran "fuera" de la historia del problema. Posteriormente, continuamos con una descripción más específica de cómo el concepto y la práctica de lo "ausente pero implícito" ofrece más posibilidades para exponer estos terrenos de la vida que se dejan de lado con frecuencia. Esta descripción incluye la presentación de un mapa de la práctica narrativa de lo "ausente pero implícito" que refleja las interpretaciones comunes que tienen los autores de los estudios y las enseñanzas más recientes de Michael White. Palabras clave: terapia narrativa, ausente pero implícito, Michael White, práctica narrativa, respuesta al trauma.

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Context - The magazine for family therapy in the UK. Issue 105 October 2009

Narrative therapy, difference and possibility: inviting new becomings

Sarah Walther & Maggie Carey

When people come along to seek out therapeutic conversations, it is generally because they are not happy with how things are going in their lives and they would like things to be diff erent. This paper explores some broad implications for practice which arise from understandings about identity which emphasise difference and possibility, and describes how these connect with the intentions and practices of narrative therapy. In particular, the paper considers how the ideas of Gilles Deleuze invite an orientation to therapeutic practice which supports the people we meet with to move from 'how things are' to 'how things might be'; from 'being' to 'becoming'.

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Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy August Issue 2009

Power To Our Journeys:

Re-membering Michael

Members of the Power To Our Journeys Group,

Jussey Verco and Shona Russell

Keywords: power to our journeys, narrative therapy, community mental health, hearing voices, revision of relationship with voices, documents of identity, skills and knowledges, solidarity, belonging.

This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Australian Academic Press for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy (ANZJFT) Volume 30, Issue 2, June 2009.

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Down Under and Up Over - Travels with Narrative Therapy

by David Epston, edited by Barry Bowen

Available here for free download.

This book was originally published by the Association of Family Therapy (UK) in 2008 and is now out of print. They have generously given permission for the manuscript to be provided to interested parties for free. For further information about AFT and their publications, go to http://www.aft.org.uk/publications/publications.asp.

Click here to download the book (192 pages, 970 KB).

Publications - Shona Russell

Russell, S. & Carey, M. (eds) 2004: Narrative Therapy: Responding to your questions. Adelaide: Dulwich Centre Publications.

Journal Articles

Morgan, A. Carey, M. Russell,S. Markey,C. Mann, S. 2008: How Stories shape us. International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work 1: 42-45.

Morgan, A. Carey, M. Russell,S. Markey,C. Mann, S. 2008.Setting a context for training. International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work. 1:37-41.

Russell, S. 2007: “Deconstructing perfectionism: narrative conversations with those suffering from eating issues.” International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work 3: 21-29.

Russell, S. 2006: “Gathering stories about growing up with a parent with mental health difficulties” International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work 3: 59-67.

Russell, S. 2005: “ The values of this work: Supporting workers' experience at the Acid Survivors Foundation” with Monira Rahman, Margaret Ryan. International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, 3&4: 48-52.

Russell, S. 2005: 'Examining discourse when talking with women.' International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, 1:53-57.

Russell, S. & Carey, M. 2003: 'Feminism, therapy and narrative ideas: Exploring some not so commonly asked questions.' International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, 2:67-91.

Russell, S. & Carey, M. 2003: 'Outsider witness practices; Some answers to commonly answered questions.' International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, 1:3-16.

Carey, M. & Russell, S. 2002: 'Re-membering: responding to commonly asked questions.' International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, 3:23-32.

Mann, S. & Russell, S. 2002: 'Narrative ways of working with women survivors of childhood sexual abuse.' International Journal of Narrative therapy and Community Work, 3:3-21.

Carey, M. & Russell, S. 2002: 'Externalising: Commonly asked questions.' International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, 2:76-84.

Russell, S. 2001: 'Ethics - A gift from the past.' International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, 1:12-14.

Publications - Maggie Carey

Papers

Carey, M. (1996) Healing the mother wound and Perspectives on the men's movement in Men's Ways of Being,edited by McLean, C.; Carey, M. and White, C. Westview Press, Colorado.

Carey, M. (1999) Escaping the effects of Violence: Therapeutic gatherings with mothers and their children. In Once Upon a Time…Narrative Therapy with Children and their Families, edited by Alice Morgan. Dulwich Centre Publications, Adelaide.

Carey, M. (1999) Reflecting on our reflections: The use of reflecting processes on gatherings. In Gecko Vol. 2. Dulwich Centre Publications, Adelaide.

Carey, M. (1999) A gathering for young homeless men: Dealing with issues of violence. Dulwich Centre Journal, No.3. Adelaide.

Carey, M. (2000) Communities of shared experience. In Extending Narrative Therapy. Dulwich Centre Publications, Adelaide.

Carey, M. (2000) Some reflections from a therapist's perspective. Towards a healthy community…The work of Latino Health Access. Dulwich centre Journal No. 3. Adelaide.

Carey, M. (2001) Acknowledging Complexity ( a reflection on: Dichotomies in the power and control story: Exploring multiple stories about men who abuse in intimate relationships, by Tod Augusta-Scott.)Gecko, No. 2. Dulwich Centre Publications, Adelaide.

Carey, M. And Russell, S. (2002) Externalising – commonly asked questions. The international Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, No. 2. Adelaide.

Russell, S. and Carey, M. (2002) Re-membering: responding to commonly asked questions. The international Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, No. 3. Adelaide.

Carey, M. (2002) What the Wildman, the Dragon-Arguing Monster and Camellia the Chameleon taught me about externalising conversations. International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, No. 4. Adelaide.

Carey, M. and Russell, S. (2003) Re-Authoring: Some answers to commonly asked questions. The International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, No. 3. Adelaide.

Carey, M. and Russell, S. (2003) Outsider-witness practices: some answers to commonly asked questions. The international Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, No. 1. Adelaide.

Carey, M. (2003) Masculinity and men's violence: Through the lenses of feminism and narrative therapy. Context 69, October. AFT Publishing, UK.

Russell, S. and Carey, M. (2003) Feminism, therapy and narrative ideas: Exploring some not so commonly asked questions. The international Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, No.2. Adelaide.

Epston, D. And Carey, M. (2008) Saying Hullo Again: Remembering Michael White. Journal of Systemic Therapies. Vol. 27, Issue 3.

Books

McLean. C., Carey, M., White, C. (eds) (1996) Men's Ways of Being. Westview Press, Colorado.

Russell, S. and Carey, M. (2004) Narrative Therapy – Responding to your questions. Dulwich Centre Publications, Adelaide.

Translated Articles

Translations of Introductions to Narrative Therapy

Click here for Italian translation